Dover beach poem summary. Matthew Arnold: Poems Quotes and Analysis 2019-02-03

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Comparing Arnold’s Dover Beach to Hecht’s Dover Bitch Essay Example for Free

dover beach poem summary

Tinker and Lowery attempt to discover a specific reference to Sophocles, suggesting passages from Antigone, The Women of Trachis, Oedipus at Colonus, and Philoctetes. He knew that the old establishments were beginning to crumble - people were losing their faith in God as the advancements in technology and science and evolution encroached. It expresses frequently the lack of faith and certitude which was the principal disease of the Victorian age. The metaphor with which the poem ends is most likely an allusion to a passage in 's of the Book 7, 44. And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night. Dover Beach: Matthew Arnold - Summary and Critical Analysis In Dover Beach Matthew Arnold is describing the slow and solemn rumbling sound made by the sea waves as they swing backward and forward on the pebbly shore.

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Poem Analysis: Matthew Arnold's Dover Beach

dover beach poem summary

In other words, the speaker argues here that living amongst nature breeds a certain type of immortality. These silent visuals could be seen only from the deck at the evenings and the roar of the sea when the pebbles cross over to the high sandy beaches and back could be heard at times. As yet, there is no emotion or thought, only images, quiet. Enjambment works together with other punctuation to maintain this pattern throughout Dover Beach. Stanza 1- The poem begins with a serene description of the sea by the speaker who stood on the coast to enjoy the captivating beauty of the sea.

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Dover Beach Summary by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

For more on that, see our section. The concept of eroding furthers the theme of the weakening of faith of beings. We are in a confused struggle as if ignorant soldiers are fighting with each other in the darkness. In his Antigone Sophocles expressed this thought. In the first part, Arnold speaks of the resonances of sea-waves on the pebbly shore. Because we can recognize the beauty in nature, but can never quite transcend our limited natures to reach it, we might be drawn to lament as well as celebrate it.

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Summary and Analysis of the Poem by Matthew Arnold

dover beach poem summary

Its message - like that of many of his other poems - is that the world's mystery has declined in the face of modernity. This is how he succeeded in composing painful tragedies. Sophocles long ago Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea. He completed an undergraduate degree at Balliol College, Oxford University after which he taught Classics at Rugby School. What's the matter with this scene? He expresses his thoughts and strong feelings here that life has to be lived full on earth and not spent dreaming to inherit the eternal bliss one day. In the second stanza the speaker is reminded of the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles who also heard the sounds of the Aegean Sea and then wrote tragedies on human misery.

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Dover Beach

dover beach poem summary

Some people have written longer comments. The moon is shining brightly fair upon the narrow English channel straits. The two responses are not mutually exclusive. See how the line pauses at the semicolon, and then the speaker turns to a new thought? The calm and quiet sea is filled with water at the time of high-tide. That fancy little trick is called a , and it divides the line into two parts. But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world. Dover Beach is Matthew Arnold's best known poem.

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Dover Beach Summary and Analysis

dover beach poem summary

Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! I bade it keep the world away, And grow a home for only thee; Nor fear'd but thy love likewise grew, Like mine, each day, more tried, more true. And the clash is as endless as time and tide. Perhaps this is to over-analyse the poem; perhaps it is to mistake Matthew Arnold himself for his speaker, standing at the window, gazing out at Dover beach. To have been brought All the way down from London, and then be addressed As a sort of mournful cosmic last resort Is really tough on a girl, and she was pretty. Stanza 2- It is an allusion to the famous tragic poet Sophocles.


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Matthew Arnold: Poems “Dover Beach” (1867) Summary and Analysis

dover beach poem summary

This imagery will appear again and again in the poem. They range in length from fourteen to six lines in length. The poet reminds the world in which there was full of faith and men believed in religion. Now the speaker tells his companion and us to change the frame, to use one of our other senses. There is a gentle breeze, that blows gently and the sea looks calm for the night.


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Poem of the week: Dover Beach

dover beach poem summary

In this poem, Arnold says that, he stands at the shore of the sea, watching the sandy shores. He worries that the chaos of the modern world will be too great, and that she will be shocked to discover that even in the presence of great beauty like that outside their window, mankind is gearing up for destruction. As long as one remains faithful, believing in a greater order, he will not be lost, overworked, or unhappy; he will always have his faith to cheer him. Arnold also studied at Balliol College, Oxford University. This vacuum needed to be filled and the speaker in stanza four suggests that only strong personal love between individuals can withstand the negative forces in the world. Ah, love, let us be true To one another! Devoid of love and light the world is a maze of confusion left by 'retreating' faith. They have become materialistic which has decreased their satisfaction in life.


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Dover Beach Summary

dover beach poem summary

Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! Post The 5 Vital Approaches on your site! At this point, the poet invites his friend, companion to come and share with him this beautiful moment of the sea. The quote serves as a concise summation of a theme that Arnold refers to time and again. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. The plight described metaphorically by the English poet is conceived to have fallen upon the whole human race. The jarring roar of the pebbles caused by the ebb and flow of the sea creates a striking contrast to the pleasant atmosphere described in the first few lines. Thou mak'st the heaven thou hop'st indeed thy home. The only way out of this disaster according to Arnold is to love and to have a faith in one another and do believe in God and live in reality rather than the land of dreams.

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