Sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13. SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Part Two, Chapters 12 2019-02-01

Sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 Rating: 6,5/10 1512 reviews

To Kill a Mockingbird: To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

The Finch family and Dill head home. Boo was eventually brought back to the Radley home. Upon learning she is chewing found gum, Jem makes her spit it out. Dill enjoys fantasy, as evidenced by his fanciful story about how babies are made. Scout wonders out loud why Mr.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Fifteen years later Boo stabbed his father in the leg with a pair of scissors, but his father refused to send Boo to an asylum. Aunt Alexandria ignored the question and continued in her annoying rude fashion. In Chapter 18, we learn that Mayella's life is one of miserable poverty and deprivation. . Scout is angry at him for not taking her side and fights him. The rigidity of behavior patterns that Aunt Alexandra and the rest of Maycomb believe in demonstrate that individuals from white families also are subject to a certain amount of discrimination on the basis of their family's social stature.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Except for a lady name Lula, they are portrayed in a very positive manner. Chapter 17 The trial begins with the testimony of the sheriff,. Did she get beaten up by her father, not Tom Robinson? Whenever strange things happen in the neighborhood, Boo is often blamed. He knows that Tom Robinson is innocent and it seems that Mr. After giving a very legal definition of rape that clears up nothing for Scout, Atticus asks why Scout doesn't ask Calpurnia. The note will ask him to come out sometimes and tell them what he's doing inside, and that they won't hurt him and will buy him ice cream.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 11 Summary

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Scout said that after a little bit it felt like Aunt Alexandria had always lived with them. Radley, Boo's father, had only been seen on his daily trip to collect groceries from 11:30am-12pm, and the family worshipped together in their own home on Sundays. Atticus teaches Scout about compromise: if she goes to school, Atticus will let her keep reading with him at home. The town legend about Boo also shows a glimpse of Maycomb life, where everyone knows each other's business and history and gossips about it as entertainment. The story starts with the first summer that Scout and Jem meet Dill, a little boy from Meridian, Mississippi who spends the summers with his aunt, the Finchs' next-door neighbor Miss Rachel Haverford. Ewell can write, and he says he can, so Atticus asks him to write his name on an envelope.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

The narrator, Jean Louise Finch, who goes by the nickname Scout, begins to tell the story of how her brother Jem broke his arm. Then she tries to engage him on the topic of his entailment, which she heard her father mention once, but notices that everyone is staring at her. Ewell's manner is of one who is beyond the law. Throughout the book, a number of characters Jem, Tom Robinson, Dill, Boo Radley, Mr. Dill is a crucial character in the story because he is both an insider and an outsider. Miss Rachel appears on the scene and reprimands Dill but allows him to stay.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Alexandra seems to believe the children would benefit from a feminine influence, and so she has decided to stay for a time. Get the latest updates: Facebook: Twitter:. The children's attempts to connect with Boo evoke, again, the sense that children will be able to see Boo with more decency and sincerity than the rest of the populace. In so doing, it is revealed that Mr. Mockingbirds The title of To Kill a Mockingbird has very little literal connection to the plot, but it carries a great deal of symbolic weight in the book.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

There's no point in apologizing unless it's sincere. Ewell is surly and crass in the witness chair, but the judge, who clearly does not respect the man, manages to keep everything orderly. Jem refuses, and one of the men tells Atticus that he has fifteen seconds to get his children to leave. Underwood reveals himself in a nearby window with a gun, pointing out that he had them covered the whole time. The Cunninghams are not all necessarily illiterate and ignorant because of a lack of intelligence, but because they are subject to a system which subverts their chances of receiving a good education. Ewell the girl's dad is dead, Jem's arm is broken, and is the one who carried Jem home.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Aunt Alexandra wants the children to know all about the Finch family and uphold its genteel heritage, but Atticus has not introduced them to the entirety of their family history, and instead has told them amusing stories, such as how their cousin Josh went insane at university. Cunningham of the human bonds that connect everyone in the town. As they run, they hear a shotgun sound somewhere behind them. Here we see how the law, which is meant to protect people, can sometimes be harmful if followed too absolutely. This foreshadows the town's treatment of later in the book - they will find him guilty despite rational evidence to the contrary. When Scout returns home from church, she find Aunt Alexandra has come to visit their home. Sometimes, it is in everyone's best interests to bend the law in special cases.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

sparknotes to kill a mockingbird chapter 13

Likewise, Atticus wants to make it possible for black people to exist on the same plane as whites, no longer subjected to an inhuman subjugation. Curious about the trial, Scout asks her father what rape is. Scout is fairly oblivious to issues of race so, in her mind, the Ewells are incredibly low-class, so she can't understand how their word holds any merit. Likewise, without people like Atticus going out of their way to help others, the darkness of prejudice could perpetuate itself indefinitely. Mayella doesn't seem to have any friends. Scout depicts her world as a place of absolutes.

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